Medical Ethic Essay Topics

A List Of Great Medical Ethics Topics For Your Essay


Medical ethics presents a range of study areas for all academic levels. There are enough materials and ideas for interesting medical ethics topics for your essay. The choice of a topic should be guided by among other things:-

  • The scope of your academic level
  • Availability of research materials
  • Your area of interest
  • Absence of extensive research in the area

Common medical ethics essay topics are boring to read and will not compel your teacher to give a good score unless you have an outstanding point of view to present. The wording of your medical ethics essay topic should arouse curiosity and interest in the reader. It must capture your point of view or position which will be justified in the body.

While there are many areas of study in medicine, not all are controversial. Some controversy is hyped while other debates are emotional to the point of drawing national outraged. When writing about medical ethics, it must dawn on you that you are dealing with delicate controversies. In some cases, it will pit available technology against social, religious or political views. In other cases, it is a discussion about the conflict between human rights and medicine. The most common contention is between personal will and technology. Whichever the case, there are numerous areas of study that will present very interesting materials and an opportunity to construct a compelling medical ethics essay. They include:-

  1. Care at the end of life: Should advance directives by the patient be obeyed or those of relatives.
  2. Abortion: Does the mother have a right over the fetus? When does life begin? Should doctors terminate pregnancies if they detect a defect?
  3. Prenatal Genetic Testing: What should be the next step if scans reveal that your child has a defect? What should you do if you are a genetic defect carrier?
  4. Birth control: Should minors have access to birth control information and substances? What is the best age to introduce birth control substances and measures?
  5. Embryonic Harvesting: Should embryonic stem cells be harvested for disease treatment purposes?
  6. Organ donation: Must the organ come from a relative? Should organs be harvested from dead people?
  7. Personal Health Information: Who should be allowed to access your personal health information?
  8. Rights of Patients: Can a patient refuse to receive treatment?
  9. Informing the family: Should a doctor or physician withhold sensitive information about your health from the family?
  10. Doctor’s Pay- Do health practitioners enrich themselves from the misfortunes of their patients?

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Medical ethics is a highly controversial and sensitive topic. It is highly debatable and prone to go in many ways. If you are writing an evaluation essay on medical ethics and find yourself in need of a topic, consider the 20 below:

  1. Doctors and Physician Assisted Suicide
  2. Nursing Theories: Which Theories Are the Most Ethical
  3. The Ethics of Preventative Medicine
  4. Religious Clashes: How Medical Ethics Confront Religious Beliefs
  5. Cultural Bias and Medical Ethics
  6. The Ethics of Care for the Mentally Handicapped
  7. The Ethics of Pregnancy: When a Doctor Can Have Their Patient Arrested
  8. Ethical Dilemmas for Doctors: When Parents Should Be Arrested for Abuse or Negligence
  9. Office Place Ethics: When Medical Practitioners Fail to Uphold Office Standards
  10. How Medical Ethics Differ in Asian Countries Compared to African Countries
  11. When Medical Ethics Are Non-Existent: What Doctors Must Do in Foreign Countries
  12. The Ethical Difficulties of Practicing Medicine Overseas
  13. Ethical Standards Across the States: What Is Ethical
  14. How to Monitor Ethics in the Medical Field
  15. Why Medical Ethics Are Still Important
  16. How Quality Medical Ethics Classes Are Taught
  17. When It Is Medically Ethical to End a Life
  18. Why Doctors Cannot End Lives of Suffering Individually
  19. The Need for International Ethics in the Medical Field
  20. Are Medical Ethics Same Everywhere?

Aren’t those interesting topics? Below is an example on one of them to help give you a better idea of what to write. Before you check it out don’t forget there we’ve also prepared 10 facts on medical ethics as well as a complete guide on an evaluation essay:

Sample Evaluation Essay: Are Medical Ethics the Same Everywhere?

There are different standards for medical ethics around the world and in some cases cultural clashes can cause a rift. When people move to America they often keep their cultural practices as a part of who they are, and nowhere was this more prevalent than with the Hmong culture. But this also creates a string of ethical dilemmas for medical practitioners in the West who are legally bound to report certain ethical problems like a parent not following the advice of a doctor after signing to do so.

Hmong people often do things in ways unfathomable to Western practitioners because they believe that each condition, its cause, and its potential results, stem from something much different than what western doctors would see. Medicine is seen as a temporary fix among the Hmong, not a permanent thing. This can be an area of ethical concern when a medical condition warrants long term medication such as seizure medication, something parents are not willing to do. In such cases, doctors are legally required to report the parents and have the child taken away even if they know the parents have nothing but the deepest love for their child. Additionally, many Hmong avoid hospitals at all possible costs because they are viewed as charnel houses, where the spirits of dead people linger, not as places of healing like they are viewed by people in the West. This can present additional ethical concerns when people will not seek the medical attention they need or their family needs.

One example of this is childbirth. Hmong women who would otherwise not seek medical care, would go to the hospital for delivery incorrectly thinking that if they delivered at home the babies wouldn’t be allowed to be U.S. citizens. They naturally deliver healthy babies most of the time in spite of not receiving any Western prenatal care, due to their culturally nutritious diets, the low rate of smoking, the low rate of drinking, The babies, as a result, are often the right size for birth. There was a high prevalence of new mothers seeking medical attention in the delivery room during the 1980’s and 1990’s but nowhere else. For having such staunch beliefs against much of Western medicine, the love and desire of mothers to ensure the very best of chances for the child overruled any cultural apprehensions in this regard and resulted in mothers bearing their babies in a place they would otherwise have avoided just to give them the citizenship. This is truly an inspiring perspective if one takes the time to think about it. A great insight into the power of strong cultural values juxtaposed against maternal instincts.

The Hmong taught a lot of lessons to the Western culture, many of which are exposed in comparison to medical ethics for Hmong and for Americans. There is a serious problem with the high prevalence of antibiotic use in people and animals, as well as the advertisements for medications on television which inevitably encourage people to incorrectly believe they have symptoms and need medication. What is particularly bothersome though is the idea that Western medicine is always right even though it often treats only the symptoms individually and not the illness, something which results in people taking medication after medication to then treat subsequent symptoms that are the direct result of the previous medication. The Hmong embodied this concept wholly with their disregard to regular medication and the use of only those medicines which were needed. Another aspect of the culture which struck me was how the Hmong people, even those Christian converts, never gave up on their roots no matter what, always seeking out the traditional medications in tandem with Western medication.

Some Hmong patients will explain what treatment they thought would be best and remained optimistic about a particular condition. Many are adamant about Hmong healing and will not follow directions from Western doctors for medications or transfusions, which can represent child abuse and a serious ethical dilemma for western doctors responsible for reporting such behaviors. It seems that with such different beliefs, the treatment of symptoms by the Western medicine will continually conflict with treatment of the entire condition or cause as Eastern medicine generally seeks to do in practice.

References:
Boylan, Michael. Medical Ethics. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000. Print.
Campbell, Alastair V and Alastair V Campbell. Medical Ethics. Auckland, N.Z.: Oxford University Press, 1997. Print.
Egendorf, Laura K. Medical Ethics. Detroit: Thomson/Gale, 2005. Print.
Fadiman, Anne. The Spirit Catches You And You Fall Down. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1997. Print.
Skloot, Rebecca. The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks. New York: Crown Publishers, 2010. Print.
Torr, James D. Medical Ethics. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press, 2000. Print.
Veatch, Robert M. Medical Ethics. Sudbury, Mass.: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 1997. Print.

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